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UCR Experts Available to Talk to Reporters About Terrorism


UCR Experts Available to Talk to Reporters About Terrorism

(October 19, 2001)

As the stories that follow the terror attacks of Sept. 11 unfold, the University of California, Riverside offers reporters a list of faculty members who can be reached for expert commentary on the diverse issues that have and will arise. Reporters with questions not on this list are welcome to contact the University Relations office, at (909) 787-5185.

Bioterrorism

CAN CHEMICAL-BIOLOGICAL AGENTS HELP CLEAN UP CONTAMINATION?

Wilfred Chen, associate professor of chemical engineering is researching the use of biochemical agents to trigger microbes into cleaning up areas of contamination in water or soil. He is also probing the ability of these agents to serve as early warning systems for contamination.

Office: (909) 787-2473

Email: Wilfred.chen@ucr.edu

HOW SAFE IS OUR WATER?

On stories about water safety, Marylynn V. Yates, Associate Executive Vice Chancellor and microbiologist, can speak about the transmission of disease-causing microorganisms through the contamination of water supplies. Her areas of research include: 1) developing and improving detection methods for microorganisms in water; 2) developing methods to assess the vulnerability of ground water to contamination; 3) examining the factors that control the lifespan of disease-causing microorganisms in the environment; and 4) assessing the effectiveness of water, wastewater and sewage treatment processes to disease-causing microorganisms.

Office: (909) 787-2358

Email: marylynn.yates@ucr.edu

Understanding the transportation of nuclear, chemical and biological agents in the soil and ground water are the research interests of Kambiz Vafai, professor of mechanical engineering. He has run simulations of nuclear contaminants in the soil and ground water for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Office: (909) 787-2135

Email: kambiz.vafai@ucr.edu

ARE CITIES MORE VULNERABLE TO BIOLOGICAL OR CHEMICAL ATTACKS?

The transportation and dispersion of chemical and biological agents in the atmosphere are the expertise of Akula Venkatram, professor and chair of mechanical engineering at the Bourns College of Engineering at UCR. He is currently involved in two projects, funded by the California Air Resources Board, to understand the dispersion of toxics in an urban environment.

Office: (909) 787-2195

Email: akula.venkatram@ucr.edu

Psychology

WHAT TURNS SOMEONE INTO A TERRORISTS?

What are the underlying social problems that radicalize people? Austin Turk, a professor of sociology, studies conflict theory, inequality and social control, political criminality (including terrorism), policing, and socio-legal studies. Turk is a Fellow and Past President of the American Society of Criminology. He has served as Chair of the Criminology Section of the American Sociological Association, and is a former Trustee of the Law and Society Association.

Office: (909) 787-4760

Email: austin.turk@ucr.edu




WHAT CAN YOU TELL THE KIDS?

Barbara Tinsley, professor of psychology at the University of California, Riverside, has expertise in child psychology. She can explain how parents might help children understand the scope of news accounts of the war that followed the attacks on Sept. 11 without scarring them psychologically.

Cell phone: (949) 293-6822.

Office: (909) 787-3889

Email: barbara.tinsley@ucr.edu

HOW CAN YOU STAY HAPPY DURING A CRISIS?

Sonja Lyubomirsky, professor of psychology, has extensively studied and written about the psychology of enduring emotions – specifically, happiness and depression. She has been studying people who have been classified as exceptionally happy or unhappy. She has explored what it is about the way people view themselves and their worlds that enable them to stay upbeat, or keeps them in the dumps. Some of her research findings depart from conventional thought. For instance, unhappy people tend to work hard at finding happiness while cheery people tend not to think too much about it. Conversely, inward examinations of the causes of depression tend to keep sufferers in a funk.

Home: (310) 453-3603

Email: sonja.lyubomirsky@ucr.edu

Public Policy

WHAT IS THE APPROPRIATE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT DURING TIMES OF CRISIS AND HOW MUCH FREEDOM ARE WE WILLING TO GIVE UP FOR SECURITY’S SAKE?

Political Science Professor Max Neiman studies public policy and wrote “Defending Government: Why Big Government Works,” which lays out the argument that government does best those things it does on a grand scale, and that despite two decades of cries for shrinking federal government, it remains larger than ever. Suddenly, America is rethinking its outlook on government for the sake of security. Neiman can address how such attitudes may threaten civil liberties.

Office: (909) 787-4693

Home: (909) 784-2724

Email: max.neiman@ucr.edu

Religion and Ethics

HOW CAN SUCH VIOLENCE BE RELIGIOUSLY BASED? AND WHAT ETHICAL DILEMMAS FACE THE U.S. IN CAPTURING AND PUNISHING THOSE RESPONSIBLE?

June O’Connor, Religious Studies Professor studies comparative religious ethics and focuses on issues such as violence, nonviolent social change and third world theologies. She is a member of the American Academy of Religion Committee on the Public Understanding of Religion. She was the principal organizer of the UCR scholarly conference on 'Religion and Ethnic Conflict,' in April 1995.

Office: (909) 787-3743

Email: june.oconnor@ucr.edu

Finance

WHAT ARE THE WAR’S IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL FINANCE?

University of California, Riverside international banking and stock market authority, Sarkis Joseph Khoury, is a professor of international finance at the A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management. He can answer questions on the effects of the war in Afghanistan on the US stock market and specifically on foreign exchange markets. Khoury has written extensively on international banking issues and on international investing. He is fluent in Arabic, French and Spanish, as well as English and he has consulted in the Middle East and published in 'The Middle East Business.' Khoury earned his Ph.D. at the Wharton Graduate Division, University of Pennsylvania. He also earned a degree with distinction at Centre Belge Beirut, Lebanon.

Office: (909) 787-3750

Cell Phone: (909) 283-1198

Email: sarkis.khoury@ucr.edu

Web site: http://www.agsm.ucr.edu/people/khoury.html

Peter Chung, associate professor of finance at the A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management at UCR, has specific expertise in international finance, emerging capital markets and investments. He can respond in Korean, as well as in English. His degrees include a Ph.D. in finance, a B.S. in international trade, and a B.S. in Foreign Service.

Office: (909) 787-3906

Cell Phone: (714) 488-8771

Email: peter.chung@ucr.edu

Web site: http://www.agsm.ucr.edu/people/chung.html.

Chunsheng Zhou, assistant professor of finance in the A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management at UCR, studies financial markets and credit risk. He can respond in Chinese, as well as in English. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University.

Office: (909) 787-6448

Email: chunsheng.zhou@ucr.edu

Web site: http://www.agsm.ucr.edu/people/zhou.html




War and Society

HOW WILL “ACTS OF WAR IMPACT SOCIETY?

Katherine Kinney, a professor of English at UCR, has written extensively about the effects of war on society and can comment on the possible impact of the air war over Afghanistan on U.S. society. Her works include the 1960’s and the Vietnam Era. She is the author of “Friendly Fire: American Identity and the Literature of the Vietnam War” (Oxford University Press, 2000). She has published articles about women and war, black soldiers and war and the way Hollywood depicts war. Kinney is currently working on a book entitled “Liberal Hollywood: Race, Politics and Style (1945-1975).”

Office: (909) 787 5301, x1900

Email: katherine.kinney@ucr.edu.

ISLAMIC WOMEN, THEIR ISSUES AND HOW THEY DEAL WITH CULTURAL AND RACIAL STEREOTYPING?

Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies Piya Chatterjee researches and teaches about women’s issues in the third world and Muslim South Asia in particular. She teaches courses on global issues about feminism and women’s politics, and the effects of colonialism, racial and cultural stereotyping on women in South Asia. Chatterjee helped organize the groundbreaking 1997 conference “Frontline Feminisms,” which brought 163 speakers from 27 countries, included figures such as Angela Davis and Fatima Ibrahim, the first female Member of Parliament in the Sudan, to UCR to discuss the effects of warfare on women.

Home: (909) 683-4764

Office: (909) 787-5219

Email: piya.chatterjee@ucr.edu

Popular Culture

WHAT’S ACCEPTABLE IN POPULAR ART, MUSIC AND PERFORMANCE AFTER SEPT. 11?

Assistant Professor of English Josh Kun has published widely as a music and cultural critic in Spin, Rolling Stone, The Village Voice, LA Weekly and Salon. He writes a bi-weekly column, 'Frequencies,' which appears in the San Francisco Bay Guardian and The Boston Phoenix. His expertise is on 20th century inter-American popular music and 20th century African-American and Latino literature and popular culture. His current research focuses on border music video. He currently hosts “Rockamole,” a weekly latin alternative music video show on cable television station KJLA in Los Angeles. He co-hosted “The Red Zone” on Y107/Viva 107.1 FM-- LA's first commercial radio show devoted exclusively to Latin Alternative music to bridge English- and Spanish-language markets.

Office: (909) 787-5301, Ext. 1907

Email: joshkun@aol.com

HOW DID SEPT. 11 AFFECT THE WAY VIOLENCE AND TRAUMA ARE PORTRAYED IN POPULAR CULTURE?

Tiffany Ana Lopez, an assistant professor of English, is doing research on the use of violence in popular culture. Her teaching focuses on 20th century American literature and drama, Chicano and Latino popular culture, and feminist and minority issues. She is currently working on a book about representations of the body and the images of community in U.S. Latina drama.

Office: (909) 787- 5301 x1929

Email: res0hui3@verizon.net

The University of California, Riverside (www.ucr.edu) is a doctoral research university, a living laboratory for groundbreaking exploration of issues critical to Inland Southern California, the state and communities around the world. Reflecting California's diverse culture, UCR's enrollment has exceeded 21,000 students. The campus opened a medical school in 2013 and has reached the heart of the Coachella Valley by way of the UCR Palm Desert Center. The campus has an annual statewide economic impact of more than $1 billion.

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