University of California, Riverside

UCR Newsroom



Human Microphone of Occupy


Human Microphone Echoes at UC Riverside

Occupy Riverside group talks around the UCR carillon tower about recent protests on college campuses.

(November 21, 2011)

UCR's Chancellor White speaks at the bell tower with students, staff and faculty.Enlarge

UCR's Chancellor White speaks at the bell tower with students, staff and faculty.

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (www.ucr.edu) — More than 250 people who identify with the “Occupy” movement shared their concerns about violence on other campuses as they engaged in direct, respectful and peaceful dialog with UC Riverside Chancellor Tim White and UCR Chief of Police Mike Lane.

“I’m proud to see our students, faculty, and staff outraged by the disinvestment in public education,” said White, who asked for protestors to direct their attention to the state capital. “Education matters to a just society,” he added, “I’ve committed my life to that. I want us to have honest, open and robust discussion on our campus.”

Protestors and administration leaders spent almost two hours together under a crisp November sky by the base of UC Riverside’s iconic bell tower. Using the technique that “Occupy” calls the “human microphone,” students, staff and faculty echoed each phrase. Questions came up about what constitutes violence, and what responses could be expected from administration in protest circumstances.

The chancellor and the police chief committed to provide a specific list of what actions would be allowed on campus. In all instances, the chancellor asked the students to “find that space where we can work together” to avoid violent situations in public demonstrations. Joined by Lane and by Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Jim Sandoval, White pointed out that there are already clearly defined rules and regulations for assembly on campus, most meant to assure public safety and continued access to classes and facilities.

“Police are our co-workers and members of the community, said White. “I can’t assure your safety without police staff support.”


Chancellor White at the bell towerEnlarge

Chancellor White at the bell tower

One of the signs of the Occupy movementEnlarge

One of the signs of the Occupy movement

UCR Police Chief Mike Lane, who graduated from UCR, talks with people gathered at the bell tower about the challenges of protecting a large university campus.Enlarge

UCR Police Chief Mike Lane, who graduated from UCR, talks with people gathered at the bell tower about the challenges of protecting a large university campus.

Chancellor White checked briefly with students Monday about how they were reacting to the weekend's images of police action on the UC Davis campus.Enlarge

Chancellor White checked briefly with students Monday about how they were reacting to the weekend's images of police action on the UC Davis campus.

The University of California, Riverside (www.ucr.edu) is a doctoral research university, a living laboratory for groundbreaking exploration of issues critical to Inland Southern California, the state and communities around the world. Reflecting California's diverse culture, UCR's enrollment has exceeded 21,000 students. The campus opened a medical school in 2013 and has reached the heart of the Coachella Valley by way of the UCR Palm Desert Center. The campus has an annual statewide economic impact of more than $1 billion.

A broadcast studio with fiber cable to the AT&T Hollywood hub is available for live or taped interviews. UCR also has ISDN for radio interviews. To learn more, call (951) UCR-NEWS.

More Information 

General Campus Information

University of California, Riverside
900 University Ave.
Riverside, CA 92521
Tel: (951) 827-1012

Department Information

Media Relations
900 University Avenue
1156 Hinderaker Hall
Riverside, CA 92521

Tel: (951) 827-6397 (951) UCR-NEWS
Fax: (951) 827-5008

Related Links

Footer